Brain on Board

Your brain is your vehicles most important safety feature.

Brain on Board

Your brain is your vehicles most important safety feature.

Young Drivers

Visual rebranding is in progress for these resources.

You obtained a driver’s licence a few months ago, so you volunteered to be the designated driver for a group of friends who have enjoyed a night out downtown.

As 2a.m. approaches, you round them up and everyone piles into the car. On the ride home, the loud talking and singing of your four drunk friends makes it hard to concentrate on the road. The noise and commotion pulls constantly at your attention. Distraction takes its toll, and you blow through a stop sign that you did not notice. Suddenly, the inside of your car is lit up by the headlights of a vehicle approaching on your right. You panic. Without much driving experience, you have no driving instincts to help you respond. You slam on the brakes, but this is the wrong thing to do. The sound of screeching tires and crunching metal quickly replaces the singing that filled the car moments ago.

Young drivers are a high-risk group whose relative inexperience behind the wheel combined with the effects of youth makes them more likely to be involved in or cause crashes. Vehicle safety features reduce crash risk when paired with safe driving. In order to gain the maximum benefit from safety features, young drivers must focus first and foremost on developing safe driving habits and refining their driving skills.

References

Isler, R., Starkey, N., Williamson, A. (2009).“Video-based road commentary training improves hazard perception of young drivers in a dual task”. Accident Analysis and Prevention. Vol. 41. 2009.

Mayhew, D.R.; Simpson, H.M.; and Singhal, D. (2005) Best practices for graduated licensing in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Traffic Injury Research Foundation.

Statistics Canada (2012). Leading causes of death in Canada 2011.

Transport Canada (2013). Canadian Motor Vehicle Traffic Collision Statistics 2011. Government of Canada.

Transport Canada (2015). Canadian Motor Vehicle Traffic Collision Statistics 2013. Government of Canada.

Transportation Research Board (TRB). (2007). Preventing Teen Motor Crashes: Contributions from the behavioural social sciences. Workshop Report. The National Academies Press. Washington, D.C.

Young and New Drivers Resource Centre (2012). Ottawa, ON: Traffic Injury Research Foundation. Zador, L., Krawchuck, S., Voas, R. (2000). “Alcohol-related relative risk of driver fatalities and driver involvement in fatal crashes in relation to drive age and gender. Journal of Studies on Alcohol. Vol. 61.